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A wave-powered prototype device is aiming to produce drinking water from the ocean PUBLISHED THU, NOV 24 20221:44 AM ESTUPDATED 38 MIN AGO

loriamen

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KEY POINTS
  • Ocean Oasis says its technology will enable "the production of fresh water from ocean waters by harnessing the energy of the waves to carry out a desalination process."
  • Development of the prototype has received financial backing from a range of organizations including Innovation Norway and the Gran Canaria Economic Promotion Society.
  • The Canary Islands are a Spanish archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean.
Plans to use marine energy to desalinate water received a further boost this week, after a Norwegian firm presented a system that will be put through its paces in waters off Gran Canaria.

In a statement Monday, Oslo-headquartered Ocean Oasis said its wave-powered prototype device, which it described as being an "offshore floating desalination plant," was called Gaia.

The plant — which has a height of 10 meters, a diameter of 7 meters and weighs roughly 100 tons — was put together in Las Palmas and will undergo testing at the Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands.

Ocean Oasis said its technology would enable "the production of fresh water from ocean waters by harnessing the energy of the waves to carry out a desalination process and pump potable water to coastal users."

The company said the development of its prototype had received financial backing from a range of organizations including Innovation Norway and the Gran Canaria Economic Promotion Society.
The main investor in Ocean Oasis is Grieg Maritime Group, which is headquartered in Bergen, Norway.

Desalination​

The Canary Islands are a Spanish archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean. According to the Canary Islands Institute of Technology, the islands have been "a pioneer in the production of desalinated water at affordable cost."

A presentation from the ITC highlights some of the reasons why. Describing the Canary Islands' "water singularities," it refers to a "structural water deficit due to low rainfall, high soil permeability and aquifer overexploitation."
While desalination — which multinational energy firm Iberdrola describes as "the process by which the dissolved mineral salts in water are removed" — is seen as a useful tool when it comes to providing drinking water to countries where supply is an issue, the U.N. has noted there are significant environmental challenges linked to it.
It says that "the fossil fuels normally used in the energy-intensive desalination process contribute to global warming, and the toxic brine it produces pollutes coastal ecosystems."

With the above in mind, projects looking to desalinate water in a more sustainable way will become increasingly important in the years ahead.

The idea of using waves to power desalination is not unique to the project being undertaken in the Canaries. In April, for example, the U.S. Department of Energy revealed the winners of the last stage of a competition focused on wave-powered desalination.

Back on the Canary Islands, Ocean Oasis said it would be looking to construct a second installation after testing at the PLOCAN facility had taken place. “In this phase, the prototype will be scaled with the capacity to produce water for consumption,” the company said.

While there is excitement about the potential of marine energy, the footprint of wave and tidal stream projects remains very small compared to other renewables.

In data released in March 2022, Ocean Energy Europe said 2.2 megawatts of tidal stream capacity was installed in Europe last year, compared to just 260 kilowatts in 2020.

For wave energy, 681 kW was installed, which OEE said was a threefold increase. Globally, 1.38 MW of wave energy came online in 2021, while 3.12 MW of tidal stream capacity was installed.

By way of comparison, Europe installed 17.4 gigawatts of wind power capacity in 2021, according to figures from industry body WindEurope.
 

loriamen

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La Cina è previdente e fa incetta di GNL mentre la UE fa solo tante chiacchiere e nessuna conclusione (forse ne fa qualcuna in modo sbagliato!)

China’s Shenzhen Energy signs long-term LNG contract with BP​

By:Reuters
Published: Nov 26, 2022, 04:52 GMT+1

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – China’s Shenzhen Energy Group has signed a long-term agreement with oil major BP to buy liquefied natural gas (LNG), aiming to lock in supplies with gas-fired power generation poised to surge in the world’s second-largest economy.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – China’s Shenzhen Energy Group has signed a long-term agreement with oil major BP to buy liquefied natural gas (LNG), aiming to lock in supplies with gas-fired power generation poised to surge in the world’s second-largest economy.

The agreement is Shenzhen Energy’s first long-term international LNG contract and its first long-term contract with BP Singapore, the Chinese company said in a statement on Friday.
The statement did not specify details of the agreement, including the duration of the contract.

“To meet the demand of Guangdong province and Shenzhen city for energy security and stability, Shenzhen Energy Group is making efforts to promote the construction of gas power plants,” it said.

“It is estimated that around 2024, as the gas power plants go into operation, the group’s total demand for natural gas will significantly rise.”

China’s LNG importers are widely expected this winter to avoid the spot market, where prices have risen sharply, relying instead on Russian supplies and long-term contracted volumes.

QatarEnergy has signed a 27-year deal to supply LNG to China’s Sinopec in the longest such agreement to date, as volatility drives buyers to seek long-term supplies.



(Reporting by Emily Chow; Editing by Edmund Klamann)
 

loriamen

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Membro dello Staff

Russia’s Crude Trades At $52, Well Below The Proposed Price Cap​

By Charles Kennedy - Nov 25, 2022, 10:00 AM CST
  • Russia’s flagship crude grade Urals currently trades at around $52 per barrel.
  • Russian crude is already trading at prices below the proposed G7-EU-UK price cap.
  • EU leaders failed to reach a decision on Thursday about the oil price cap.
Russia’s flagship crude grade Urals currently trades at around $52 per barrel, more than $10 a barrel lower than the low end of a proposed G7-EU-UK price cap of $65-$70 per Russian barrel of crude, according to Bloomberg.

No final decision has been taken by the G7 and the EU yet, but the price cap mechanism and the EU embargo on imports of Russian crude by sea are set to enter into force in less than two weeks, on December 5.

Reports emerged on Wednesday that the EU is discussing capping the price of Russian oil at somewhere between $65 and $70 per barrel. Such a cap, if approved, would not effectively lower the price of the flagship Russian crude currently being traded on the market.

The EU ambassadors of the 27-member bloc were discussing the G7 proposal of a cap this week but failed to reach a decision on Thursday as EU countries are split over whether a price cap of $65-$70 is too high or too low.

A $65-$70 per barrel price cap for Russia’s oil is not expected to immediately shrink Putin’s oil revenues, considering that this is more or less the price that buyers currently pay for Russian crude, multiple industry sources familiar with the transaction prices told Reuters on Thursday.

Wood Mackenzie’s vice president of gas and LNG research, Massimo Di Odoardo, told CNBC on Friday, “Those levels of discounts are certainly in line with what the discounts already are in the market.”

“It’s something that doesn’t seem, as it is placed, like it’s going to have any effect [on Moscow] whatsoever if the price is so high,” Di Odoardo added.

Buon W. E.!!!
 
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